Adoption


So you want to know more about adopting and living with a Tamaskan Dog...

This breed is NOT for first time dog owners, unless you are sure you can have control over them. I highly recommend a 6' fence. I also recommend that pups go to homes that have other dogs as this is a very social breed.

Bringing a puppy home is an exciting thing. Be sure to know the best breed for you before you adopt any puppy. Tamaskans are not the breed for everyone. They are considered to be an arctic breed (like huskies and malamutes) so they do have a pack mentality. Because of this, they do not like being alone--so having a second dog, a pet parent who stays home most of the time or a pet parent who is fortunate enough to have a job that allows fur kids to come along every day is ideal!

Tamaskan Dogs are a working breed. More specifically, they are bred to have workability including pulling sleds, tracking, obedience and agility. We find that walking our Tamaskan Dogs every day is an important part of their mental and physical well being. Daily exercise also reduces the chances of any dog for becoming bored, and as a result finding ways to entertain himself that may not be so amusing to you!

Grooming is necessary. We brush our dogs 2 to 3 times per week, and bathe them when they are stinky. If you brush your dog well, there is usually not very much fur floating around in the house. But I do vacuum more than once a week. HA!

Tamaskan Dogs have a keen interest in learning. I would highly recommend positive reinforcement training methods. Our Tamaskan is particularly keen on a toy that she cares as her own baby. We have practiced recall with our dogs on a regular basis and taking our dogs off leash is an enjoyable experience, rather than a stressful one because of this training. However I would encourage every dog owner to invest in a fluorescent orange dog vest. Remington makes a nice skid plate style that not only protects their underside from thorns and sharp brush, but protects them from being mis-identified. Let's face it, we love this breed because they look like a wild-type dog. So much so that they could easily be mistaken for a coyote or wolf. Play it safe and make it clear to everyone whom you might meet in the fields and woods that this animal running around is indeed someone's pet. A collar is not enough. Give your dog the protection of maximum visibility a dog vest offers.

We also highly recommend crate training your dog. It keeps them safe while you cannot give 100% of your attention to them.

Many young Tamaskan do experience motion sickness. This is displayed by excessive drooling or even vomiting in the car. Our Tamaskan has grown out of this and no longer drool in the car. In fact, she come to like the car! Going for a ride almost always means something fun is going to happen! We tend to take our dogs on most of our outdoor recreational trips.

Tamaskan Dogs do drink a lot of water. Always have fresh, clean water available for your dog. Especially outside.

For cost, please see pricing page. Cost of a puppy does NOT include shipping costs or crates.

THE IDEAL HOME
The ideal home for a Tamaskan Dog has many characteristics. Because of the dog's nature, it is best if the Tamaskan either goes to a forever home that has other dogs, or one where the owner stays home most of the time or can take their dog with them.

Tamaskan Dogs are a working breed. They enjoy activities such as pulling in Canicross, Skijoring, or Cart or Sled Pulling. Tamaskan Dogs also can be trained and excel in agility, tracking and as service dogs.

We enjoy taking our dog for long walks. We walk her almost every day and this keeps her healthy, happy and out of trouble and boredom!

FOOD
Many Tamaskan Dogs have clearly shown less of a tolerance for grain in their diets. I would recommend a grain free diet, cooking for your dog, or a BARF diet. If you choose to feed your dog kibble, I would recommend the following website to make your decision about dog food brands: www.dogfoodanalysis.com. We rotate our dog through several of the five star brands. Food rotation keeps a dog healthy and helps prevent allergies from developing. Also supplement with whole foods or vegetables such as sweet potato, peas, broccoli and carrots (Leia LOVES Carrots!). Many Tamaskan owners also feed a raw diet, although we always cook the meat for Leia to keep her hunting instinct low. If you would like more information, please send me a note.

Never EVER give your dogs cooked bones. These can and do splinter and can kill dogs. Raw, non-weight bearing bones are best (such as wing bones from a chicken or rib bones).

TOYS
Tamaskan Dogs are fairly hard on toys. We recommend toys of the hard rubber type such as Kongs, as well as Nylabones, natural antlers, and stuffed animals without the stuffing such as skinz. Squeakers are usually destroyed quickly--but they do enjoy them. Please keep an eye on your dog so that they don't ingest the squeaker.

TRAINING
We highly recommend positive reinforcement training. Please consult a professional regarding training and especially behavior modification for your dog. A great place to start is your local dog club. Basic commands can be learned from books such as The Complete Idiot's Guide to Positive Dog Training as a place to start.

BUYER BEWARE
The Tamaskan Dog Register is the only registry for Tamaskan Dogs worldwide. A list of registered breeders can be found on the TDR's website. This does sometimes change as new breeders sign up, and some breeders leave the organization. Please be sure to check if your Tamaskan Dog breeder is listed on the Tamaskan Dog Registry website. You can find this listing here: TDR Registered Breeders.

Any Tamaskan Dog purchased through an unregistered breeder will not have registration papers through the Tamaskan Dog Registry. Owners of unregistered dogs cannot prove parentage, and generally will not be able to breed their dogs and register puppies through the TDR. Why is this important? Once Tamaskan Dog numbers are high enough and the Board determines we wish to register as a Rare Breed with the AKC or UKC, only dogs registered with the TDR will be registered under the national kennel clubs. In addition, some Tamaskan Dogs have fallen into the hands of puppy mills. Puppy mills are cruel places where dogs are kept in kennels all year round, never allowed to socialize with people, are bred on every heat cycle, and where dog health and well being is the last consideration. By purchasing a puppy from a registered breeder, you are supporting ethical dog breeding practices, and rejecting animal cruelty.
We are currently in the process of screening potential new owners for suitability. Homes with a garden AND experience with Arctic / Wolfdog / German Shepherd breeds are preferred, but not necessarily required.

Please note: adoption is only approved according to suitability... We will not accept any deposits until pregnancy has been confirmed. For cost, please see pricing page. Cost of a puppy does NOT include shipping costs or crates.

Please complete our PUPPY APPLICATION FORM to begin the screening process to be placed on our Waiting List. Thank you!

Adoption



So you want to know more about adopting and living with a Tamaskan Dog...

This breed is NOT for first time dog owners, unless you are sure you can have control over them. I highly recommend a 6' fence. I also recommend that pups go to homes that have other dogs as this is a very social breed.

Bringing a puppy home is an exciting thing. Be sure to know the best breed for you before you adopt any puppy. Tamaskans are not the breed for everyone. They are considered to be an arctic breed (like huskies and malamutes) so they do have a pack mentality. Because of this, they do not like being alone--so having a second dog, a pet parent who stays home most of the time or a pet parent who is fortunate enough to have a job that allows fur kids to come along every day is ideal!


Tamaskan Dogs are a working breed. More specifically, they are bred to have workability including pulling sleds, tracking, obedience and agility. We find that walking our Tamaskan Dogs every day is an important part of their mental and physical well being. Daily exercise also reduces the chances of any dog for becoming bored, and as a result finding ways to entertain himself that may not be so amusing to you!

Grooming is necessary. We brush our dogs 2 to 3 times per week, and bathe them when they are stinky. If you brush your dog well, there is usually not very much fur floating around in the house. But I do vacuum more than once a week. HA!

Tamaskan Dogs have a keen interest in learning. I would highly recommend positive reinforcement training methods. Our Tamaskan is particularly keen on a toy that she cares as her own baby. We have practiced recall with our dogs on a regular basis and taking our dogs off leash is an enjoyable experience, rather than a stressful one because of this training. However I would encourage every dog owner to invest in a fluorescent orange dog vest. Remington makes a nice skid plate style that not only protects their underside from thorns and sharp brush, but protects them from being mis-identified. Let's face it, we love this breed because they look like a wild-type dog. So much so that they could easily be mistaken for a coyote or wolf. Play it safe and make it clear to everyone whom you might meet in the fields and woods that this animal running around is indeed someone's pet. A collar is not enough. Give your dog the protection of maximum visibility a dog vest offers.

We also highly recommend crate training your dog. It keeps them safe while you cannot give 100% of your attention to them.


Many young Tamaskan do experience motion sickness. This is displayed by excessive drooling or even vomiting in the car. Our Tamaskan has grown out of this and no longer drool in the car. In fact, she come to like the car! Going for a ride almost always means something fun is going to happen! We tend to take our dogs on most of our outdoor recreational trips.

Tamaskan Dogs do drink a lot of water. Always have fresh, clean water available for your dog. Especially outside.

For cost, please see pricing page. Cost of a puppy does NOT include shipping costs or crates.

THE IDEAL HOME

The ideal home for a Tamaskan Dog has many characteristics. Because of the dog's nature, it is best if the Tamaskan either goes to a forever home that has other dogs, or one where the owner stays home most of the time or can take their dog with them.

Tamaskan Dogs are a working breed. They enjoy activities such as pulling in Canicross, Skijoring, or Cart or Sled Pulling. Tamaskan Dogs also can be trained and excel in agility, tracking and as service dogs.

We enjoy taking our dog for long walks. We walk her almost every day and this keeps her healthy, happy and out of trouble and boredom!

FOOD


Many Tamaskan Dogs have clearly shown less of a tolerance for grain in their diets. I would recommend a grain free diet, cooking for your dog, or a BARF diet. If you choose to feed your dog kibble, I would recommend the following website to make your decision about dog food brands: www.dogfoodanalysis.com. We rotate our dog through several of the five star brands. Food rotation keeps a dog healthy and helps prevent allergies from developing. Also supplement with whole foods or vegetables such as sweet potato, peas, broccoli and carrots (Leia LOVES Carrots!). Many Tamaskan owners also feed a raw diet, although we always cook the meat for Leia to keep her hunting instinct low. If you would like more information, please send me a note.

Never EVER give your dogs cooked bones. These can and do splinter and can kill dogs. Raw, non-weight bearing bones are best (such as wing bones from a chicken or rib bones).

TOYS


Tamaskan Dogs are fairly hard on toys. We recommend toys of the hard rubber type such as Kongs, as well as Nylabones, natural antlers, and stuffed animals without the stuffing such as skinz. Squeakers are usually destroyed quickly--but they do enjoy them. Please keep an eye on your dog so that they don't ingest the squeaker.

TRAINING
We highly recommend positive reinforcement training. Please consult a professional regarding training and especially behavior modification for your dog. A great place to start is your local dog club. Basic commands can be learned from books such as The Complete Idiot's Guide to Positive Dog Training as a place to start.

BUYER BEWARE

The Tamaskan Dog Register is the only registry for Tamaskan Dogs worldwide. A list of registered breeders can be found on the TDR's website. This does sometimes change as new breeders sign up, and some breeders leave the organization. Please be sure to check if your Tamaskan Dog breeder is listed on the Tamaskan Dog Registry website. You can find this listing here: TDR Registered Breeders.

Any Tamaskan Dog purchased through an unregistered breeder will not have registration papers through the Tamaskan Dog Registry. Owners of unregistered dogs cannot prove parentage, and generally will not be able to breed their dogs and register puppies through the TDR. Why is this important? Once Tamaskan Dog numbers are high enough and the Board determines we wish to register as a Rare Breed with the AKC or UKC, only dogs registered with the TDR will be registered under the national kennel clubs. In addition, some Tamaskan Dogs have fallen into the hands of puppy mills. Puppy mills are cruel places where dogs are kept in kennels all year round, never allowed to socialize with people, are bred on every heat cycle, and where dog health and well being is the last consideration. By purchasing a puppy from a registered breeder, you are supporting ethical dog breeding practices, and rejecting animal cruelty.

We are currently in the process of screening potential new owners for suitability. Homes with a garden AND experience with Arctic / Wolfdog / German Shepherd breeds are preferred, but not necessarily required.

Please note: adoption is only approved according to suitability... We will not accept any deposits until pregnancy has been confirmed. For cost, please see pricing page. Cost of a puppy does NOT include shipping costs or crates.

Please complete our PUPPY APPLICATION FORM to begin the screening process to be placed on our Waiting List. Thank you!